belfebe (belfebe) wrote,
belfebe
belfebe

Chalice of the Sun God VI -- Castor and Pollux: Leda's Twins

Greetings everyone!

In order to give everyone time to prepare, and taking into account how long can a project take, I would like to give everyone heads up on what the theme will be for Chalice of the Sun God VI, which will take place in September, 2009, in the Barony of Ponte Alto.

Sooooo, the next Chalice of the Sun God will feature twins, swans, St. Elmo's Fire, constellations, and everything in between. As long as your entry relates to the legend of the twins and their mother in any way, shape or form, your entry is good. Last time we had a wonderful time with the different approaches that folks had for the event's theme. We are hoping to have as much fun this time.

Below is a brief recount of the legend. And you can do your own research and find out more about it. We can't wait to see what you come up with!

Good luck, and have fun with it!

Yours in Service,

Belphoebe
Your Friendly Neighborhood Autocrat

CHALICE OF THE SUN GOD VI: CASTOR AND POLLUX – LEDA’S TWINS

Castor and Pollux were the twin sons of Leda (as in Leda and the Swan). They were also the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra and the half-brothers of Timandra, Phoebe, and Philonoe. They are known collectively in Greek as the Dioskouroi or Dioscuri, "sons of Zeus", and in Latin as the Gemini ("twins") or Castores. Castor means "beaver" in both Greek and Latin, and poludeukeis means "much sweet wine". They are sometimes also termed the Tyndaridae in reference to their alternative fatherhood by Tyndareus.

In the myth the twins shared the same mother (Leda) but had different fathers (Zeus, the immortal father of the gods; and Tyndareus, Leda’s mortal husband). This meant that Pollux, the son of Zeus, was immortal while Castor, son of Tyndareus, was not. When Castor died, Pollux asked Zeus to let him share his own immortality with his twin to keep them together and they were transformed into the Gemini constellation. The pair were regarded as the patrons of sailors, to whom they appeared as Saint Elmo's Fire.
Tags: chalice, events
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